Pre-Seasoned Cast Iron Cookware Use & Care


The Art of Iron Casting
The drive to spread our creations emanates from a deep feeling of caring about the people who cook, and about our environment. This is why we choose to conduct a nonchemical production process along with an 85% natural ore use in our casts. Unlike most cast iron makers who choose canola oil, we use only soybean oil to pre-season our cast irons, which has less cholestrol and less trans fat. Avoiding the use of metals of unknown sources and chemical layering techniques isn't only healthier for us, it is also healthier for our environment.

From the ore to your kitchen, Guro's cast iron products undergo a series of monitored and carefully measured processing stages. Being able to reach a staggering 85% ore concentration is the first out of many crucial challenges that our crew faces daily. Achieving the fine finish of each of our creations requires paying meticulous attention to the sands that we use as our expandable molding method. Finally, solidifying the iron is done evenly in order to produce a high quality cast, clear from contaminations and "bubbles" in the iron.


Before first use
Before starting to use your new GURO cast iron cookware, please make sure that it is clean, and that there's no dust on it that was gained during its time inside the box. Wash it with water and dry it completely. Drying can also be done by heating the cast iron; if you choose this method, use low-medium heat and allow it to gain heat gradually. Avoid splashing water on the cookware while it is very hot. 


Care
Any pre-seasoned cast iron cookware requires some (though not a lot of) attention in order to prevent rust formation and accumulation on it. Using and caring your pre-seasoned cast iron is performed via a simple routine: Cook, Clean, Season, Repeat. Here is how.

 

Cook
- Your GURO pre-seasoned cast iron is ready to use out of the box. It is compatible with all types of heat surfaces, grill and campfires.
- It cannot be used inside a microwave; use an oven instead.
- Using an induction based (glass-top or equivalent)? Always lift the cookware to move it, do not slide it across as it may scratch the cooking surface. 
- Pre-heat the cookware slowly using either low of medium heat until it gradually heats.
 
Clean
- Wash the cast iron thoroughly by hand, as pre-seasoned cast iron is not compatible with a dishwasher.
- Use a brush to scrub off sticky foods from the cookware. For heavier stains, scrap using a pan and salt paste. Another way to fight stickiness is to repeat the process after filling the cookware with hot water for 5 minutes.
- Use a cloth or a paper towel to dry the cookware until it is completely dry. You can also slowly warm up the cookware until all the water vapor out.
 
Season
- Apply a thin layer of any kind of vegetable oil.
- Warm up the cookware (slowly, using low-medium heat) until some smoke begins to form.
- Turn the heat off, and rub some more oil on the cookware. 

- Store in a dry place.
 

 

Troubleshoot

Rust
Formation and accumulation (a.k.a oxygenation) of rust on cast iron cookware is perhaps a frightening but rather not a rare sight even if you always followed the seasoning instructions fully. Here is how to save the situation:

- Warm up the cookware slowly and gradually using low-medium heat. Wash the cast iron using an abrasive brush in hot water and some soap. Yes, soap. Then wash the cookware.
- Rub the hot cookware with vegetable oil until a thin layer of oil forms. 
- Place the cast iron upside down in a 400°F oven, and leave it there for an hour to 70 minutes. 
- Let the cookware cool down on its own. Do not try to wash it with cold water to expedite the process. 
- Store the cookware in a dry place.
 
Black Residue
Sometimes, when cleaning your cast iron, you may run into black stains on your towel while drying it. Well, that's not dangerous; in fact, it is totally natural and safe. It can be either burnt foods that didn't come off while while cleaning, or some pre-seasoning layer coming off due to contact with a sort of acidic food that was cooked on it earlier. Wash the cookware again, using hot water.