JAPANESE TETSUBIN TEAPOTS
History & Tradition
In Japanese, the name Tetsubin stands for an iron kettle. Originally, the Tetsubin was part of the ancient oriental Japanese kitchen and was heated over a charcoal fire. During the 19th century, infused tea became more popular and Tetsubin were considered status symbols in addition to their functional use.

Valued for their durability and heat retention, cast iron cookware have been around for over two thousand years. Before the invention of the kitchen stove in the middle of the 19th century, cast irons were used in the hearth or over the fireplace. Dutch Ovens (dutch as in fake, not from Holland) were developed with the onset of the industrial revolution and became ever more popular during the first half of the 20th century, a time when most Americans households had at least one cast iron cookware piece.

JAPANESE TETSUBIN TEAPOTS

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